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Who doesn’t love delectable seafood but do our seafood consumption habits causing harm to marine life? Is there a way to sustainably consume seafood? Presenting fourth edition of Save Oceans Guide on how to eat safe and sustainable seafood.

 

Why seafood impacts ocean conservancy

Did you know that 80% of ocean pollution is due to land based activities? Every action in daily life however innocuous, has a carbon impact. Does that mean negating those aspects of life altogether? At UrbanMeisters we try to strategically re-think our daily urban living to leave a more positive carbon footprint. A little adjustment here, a better plan there and you can see the green results for yourself. Like our seafood eating habits. Who doesn’t like a sumptuous plateau de fruits de mer?! Or a delectably grilled lobster? We can go on, the long and short of it is that folks all around the world indulge in seafood. For coastal people it’s a daily food group and for others it is a universal indulgence. 

Is this indulgence going too far or too wrong? In China shark fin soup is the most sought after delicacy but the process of shark finning is cruel and most importantly sharks are an endangered species thus banning shark finning in most countries. Japanese puffer fish delicacy is a daredevil act because of it’s inherent dangers but does this harm our enviornment also? Caviar is considered the ultimate in epicurean indulgence but the most sought after variety- Beluga Caviar makes the fish breed susceptible to overfishing according to the Food and Water Watch report. Atlantic salmon populations have been driven close to extinction due to over consumption and now most of these are farmed which comes with its own set of health problems.

Presenting a safe and sustainable seafood guide in our Save Oceans Series with partners ModestFish.com which tells you eat right and eat well. Bon appétit!

 

Sustainable Seafood Guide

Different fish populations around the world are being depleted due to over consumption, out-of-hand demand, loss of habitat due to marine pollution and unsustainable fishing practices. Our seafood cravings don’t leave a very responsible sustainability impact and that’s in part because we don’t give a lot of thought to eating sustainably. 90% of the seafood consumed in the U.S. alone is imported. Demand effects supply everywhere so we can ceratinly help by making the right seafood choices when at the market or dining out. Read the infographic below to understand how you can switch to sustainable and safe seafood eating habits:

 

OWOO_KnowYourSeafood

Source: Infographic by One World One Ocean used by ModestFish.com for Ocean Pollution Guide

 

Two golden rules we recommend following while ordering or buying seafood are the following:

 

1. Before shoping or ordering seafood, make sure to ask these questions:

  • Where is the seafood/fish from?
  • Is it sea catch or farmed-raised?
  • How was it caught?
  • How was it farmed?

Avoid any seafood where there’s no information on the sustainability of operations. If the company/ restaurant/ shop isn’t making it easy for you to find information regarding sustainable fish stocks and fishing methods, definitely avoid.

 

2. Stay away from these Dirty Dozen

  • Atlantic cod
  • Atlantic flatfish (Atlantic halibut, flounder and sole)
  • Caviar (especially from beluga and other wild-caught sturgeon)
  • Chilean seabass
  • Eel
  • Farmed salmon (often called “Atlantic salmon”)
  • Imported basa/swai/tra (often labeled “catfish”)
  • Imported farmed shrimp
  • Imported king crab
  • Orange roughy
  • Sharks
  • Atlantic Bluefin tuna

This is a very comprehensive list by Food and Water Watch Org and you’d do good to avoid these items completely for your health and for the health of our oceans. In fact UrbanMeisters, our complete food intake can be adapted to make a more positive enviornmental impact. We had given you a guide of pollution free food for healthier lifestyle which has a great section on seafood.

 

Know Your Seafood

Read how to eat pollution free seafood

 

If you watch what you eat you can not only become more fit but also make a positive eco impact by planning a green food in take. From food transportation to contamination and global food waste- all contributes heavily to pollution on the planet. So while counting those calories also think of the carbon count of your food and bring it down in these 3 easy ways:

 

GREEN-LIVING-TIPS-FOOD-3

Read Green Living Guide on how to eat green and eco-friendly

 

So with these tips eat well, eat healthy and eat right be it seafood or any other food! Hope you found this Save Oceans Guide helpful because we want to give you all aspects of helping reduce marine pollution. If you have more suggestions then write to us on contact@urbanmeisters.com or post your tip on social media with #GreeningIsWinning & tag @urbanmeisters (on FacebookInstagram & Twitter). Let’s share our green living hacks.

 

READ OUR SAVE OCEANS GUIDE 1 ON CHEWING GUM HERE

SAVE OCEANS GUIDE COVER

 

READ OUR SAVE OCEANS GUIDE 2 ON DISPOSABLE PLASTIC RAZORS

OCEAN POLLUTION FROM PLASTIC LIKE RAZORS

 

READ OUR SAVE OCEANS GUIDE 3 ON PARTY ESSENTIALS

OCEAN MARINE POLLUTION PARTY DECORATION

 

READ OUR SAVE OCEANS GUIDE 5 ON MICROBEADS & MICROFIBERS

microbeads marine pollution

 

 

 

 

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